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Posts Tagged ‘Ecology’

In a thru-hike, after 4-6 weeks, a hiker gets “trail legs.”  Trail legs give thru-hikers a sense of power and confidence because hiking 15 miles a day has suddenly become easy. To challenge a thru-hiker, the hiker needs to do more miles per day.  Instead of feeling happy with 15 miles, a hiker can feel lazy if they do not make 20 miles and pushes toward the 25 mile per day average.  A thru-hiker notices their trail legs have come in when they pass day hikers who have only a water bottle in their hand and are out of breath while the thru-hiker feels great and does not breathe hard with a full pack.

Trail legs feel great because, as a hiker, it brings a boost of confidence.  They make the challenge of hiking over 2,000 miles look like a reasonable challenge instead of nearly impossible.  Usually the leg muscles become larger as a physical representation of the hard work already done.  Foot pain still plagues the hiker, but the hiker may not say, “My feet hurt” as the first response to “How are you?”

A halved aphid gall off of a blue spruce.

A halved aphid gall off of a blue spruce.

In TSS, after so many times teaching a variety of age ranges about ecological communities, I barely even needed a lesson plan.  Having the ability to whip out any number of lessons on ecological communities of GTNP, gave me a huge boost of confidence.  From being terrified to teach to being comfortable doing so, I felt as if I really had learned a lot.  Just like trail legs, teaching a communities day became a staple of comfort and confidence.  As the fall teaching practicum progressed, suddenly one of the teaching days seemed like no problem at all.  Each time I taught it, I taught it a bit differently, but felt comfortable changing it at a whim.  I felt comfortable fielding any questions that students threw my way including: “Aren’t all the trees just pines?” or “What type of poop is that?” or “What are those marks that look like butterflies on aspen trees?”

To teach a communities day well, however, required a certain knowledge of on campus trails, none of which were marked.  Many had small spur trails to good teaching sites, but went nowhere else.  It also required a thorough understanding of the communities from our Community Ecology course.  To teach this day successfully, my brain needed to hurt for quite some time, then I needed to drink from the fire hose.

When the government shut down in October, we knew how to teach communities day on the Jackson Campus as well.

When the government shut down in October, we knew how to teach communities day on the Jackson Campus as well.

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